Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Real Talk About Breastfeeding

I'm not going to write about the benefits of breastfeeding. I'm sure you've already done extensive research on all of that. Instead, let's talk about all the things books will not tell you about breastfeeding.

1) Your baby surprisingly knows what to do for the most part, even if you don't:

When the nurse handed me my 20-minute old baby and told me to try feeding her I looked at her baffled. I didn't even know how to hold my baby and suddenly I was supposed to feed her? The nurse asked if I had taken any classes and I told her that I had done plenty of reading, but no classes. "Uh oh," she responded. Thanks for the encouragement, lady.

Then this total stranger grabbed my boob and stuck it in my baby's face and she latched on like a little fish. And it was amazing.

2) It will hurt. A LOT:

The lactation consultant at the hospital will ask you if it hurts. When you say that it does, she'll tell you that you're doing it wrong. She'll then take your boob with her ice cold hand and shove it further into the baby's mouth and ask if that feels better. You'll say yes, even if it doesn't just to get her to leave you alone.

For the first month it will feel like someone is trying to twist your nipples off for thirty minutes at a time.  Eventually, your nipples will toughen up and you will no longer wince every time she eats.

3) Milk can spray across the room:

At some point you'll be coming out of the shower and realize that milk is spraying out of both boobs and you'll be paralyzed in the bathroom, naked, with both hands cupping your breasts. Just let go, girl. The bathroom counters and floor can be wiped off later.

You will also accidentally spray milk into your poor child's eye and the stunned look on her face will be hilarious.

4) You may wake up in a puddle of milk:

Sometimes nursing pads slip while you are sleeping. Thankfully, milk stains wash out of sheets and clothes (for the most part).

5) Mornings will be spent milking yourself like a cow:

Engorgement happens, especially in the mornings. Your supple bosoms will turn rock hard. This may mean that your letdown will be too fast for your baby so it will be beneficial to pump or self express before feeding her. I find that if I don't do this she will be more likely to spit up or pull away. Think of the scene from the movie The Neighbors while doing this and laugh at the absurdity of it all at 4am.

6) You will be the sole provider of nourishment for your baby, and it will be exhausting:

This is probably the toughest part of breastfeeding. Although your husband is around, there is just not much that he can do other than change diapers, and do you really want to wake him up in the middle of the night just for that? Sure, you can have him take over for a feeding if your baby will take a bottle, but that just means you'll have to get up to pump anyway so that you can keep your milk supply up.

7) Those first few weeks you will wonder if formula really is "that bad":

I can't tell you how many times I wanted to quit that first month. Even hubby was willing to go to formula because he saw how badly I was struggling. However, using the bottle is really troublesome as well because it requires measuring, warming, and washing. It's easier to pop out your boob.

Full tummies make us happy.
I'm glad I stuck with it, but I can certainly see why some moms choose formula over breastfeeding. It's rough, man!

Eventually, you'll become a pro and will be able to breastfeed while walking around the house. Just make sure you've closed your curtains.

8) Wardrobe decisions will be based on how easily accessible your boob is to your child:

Nursing camis, stretchy shirts, and button down tops will be your new best friends. I miss wearing cute clothes and I've already warned The Hubby that I will be treating myself to a brand new wardrobe when I stop breastfeeding.

9) Milk wasted is a real thing:

The next best thing to a baby drunk on milk is a smiling baby. If you can get a milk drunk baby to smile, your heart will melt and all will be good with the world again.

It is remarkable how easily you can comfort a screaming baby just by feeding her, and sometimes nursing is the only thing that will calm her.

10) Holy cow! You're making milk! You're amazing, Mama!

Seriously. The human body is pretty darn cool. Applaud yourself!


1. Always keep a water bottle by your side as breastfeeding makes you extremely thirsty. Make sure the bottle allows you to drink with one hand, like this one.
2. We go through ten bibs in two days. My baby is a spit up expert and the use of bibs means I get to change her outfit less often.
3. You will leak milk and nursing pads will make it less messy and embarrassing. I prefer the Lansinoh brand over the Medela ones.
4. The Feed Baby Pro app is such a lifesaver, especially in those early days. I started using it while at the hospital as nurses would come in the middle of the night and ask when the last time I fed my baby was and how many wet or dirty diapers we've changed. And you'll be like "I can't remember. I just popped a human being the size of a watermelon out of my vagina twelve hours ago. Please GTFO so we can rest."Sleep deprivation is not pretty, folks. You can set an alarm to alert you when the next feeding is and it'll track which boob you last fed on, which is especially helpful for me because I can never remember.
5. Forgot those tiny burp cloths. You need maximum coverage. I like to use flannel receiving blankets instead.
6. I first tried using a natural nipple butter and found it to be useless in relieving pain. Get the lanolin!
7. Some say you shouldn't have the television playing in the background, but you're going to need something to keep you awake at 2am. I recommend binge watching on Netflix the following shows: Parenthood, Gilmore Girls, Friday Night Lights, Alias, Chuck
8. I love our Mombo Nursing Pillow and find it to be sturdier than the popular Boppy.
9. I live in these nursing camis from Target and have four that go into rotation. 

Saturday, January 24, 2015

Dear Baby: This is Really Hard

Dear Baby,

Let me preface this by saying that I am truly happy to be lucky enough to be your mom. I love you, I absolutely do. But being your mom is so incredibly difficult, Baby.

I am writing this to document my journey. I want you to know what I am going through so that when it is your turn you won't feel like a failure if things aren't perfect.

I remember calling a good friend of mine after she had her baby. She had been dealing with infertility for so long that her son was a miracle, yet she wasn't completely happy at the time. I couldn't understand it, but I do now. You will get it too one day, and I will be there by your side to help you get through it.

So many moms post pictures of themselves on social media with their newborns and everyone is smiling and happy, myself included. No one ever talks about the lump in the back of your throat when you can't get your baby to stop crying. I feel so defeated and inadequate when you cry, Baby. I know that you can't help it as it is the only way you can communicate right now, but it wears on me.

You cry when you're hungry so I stick my boob in your face. You cry when you're tired and I say to you, "Little girl, just go to sleep. No one is keeping you up." You cry when you're not being held so I swoop you up in my arms. You cry when I'm not walking around while you're being held so I find myself taking laps around the kitchen island while I try to get dinner ready for the night.

I find myself whispering in your ear, "I love you, Baby," whenever you cry to calm myself.

I spend my time begging you to just take a nap long enough so that I can use the bathroom or eat a sandwich for lunch. My days are monotonous: nursing, changing diapers, rocking you to sleep. I count down the minutes until Dad gets home so that I can have just a moment of rest and someone to talk to who actually understands what I'm saying.

Then there's the enormous stress of taking care of you. I think about you every second of every day. I hate taking you out of the house because I never think that you're warm enough and I'm terrified of you getting sick. I worry about my own health now because who would be able to take care of you if something should happen to me? The amount of anxiety I have now that you're here is astronomical.

When you were two weeks old we went to the post office together. At the time Dad and I were using a convertible car seat rather than an infant car seat, which meant I had to unbuckle you and put you in a sling. It was 30 degrees out so I did all of this in the cramped backseat of the car to keep you warm. As I pulled you out I saw that you had pooped out of your diaper and through your clothes. I had no choice but to carry you inside anyway, with poop leaking onto my own clothes.

As we stood in line, I felt a sudden gush of blood coming out of me and it would not stop. We made it home, covered in mustard yellow poop, and I hurriedly changed you and nursed you until you fell asleep. For that hour of time I feared I was hemorrhaging and needed to go to the hospital. I started to cry, not out of fear for myself, but for you, Baby. What would you do without me?

When we picked up Dad from work that evening he cheerfully asked me how my day was. I answered him not with words, but with tears. "This is really hard, " I finally blabbered.

As a first time mom, I am always questioning my parenting skills. Am I giving you enough tummy time or will you never be able to crawl and walk? Should I be talking or singing to you more often? We haven't been reading to you nightly like I promised we would. Does this mean you won't like books later on in your life? Is it okay that you're still sleeping in your Rock 'n Play instead of your crib? Will you ever be able to sleep without being swaddled? What if a fire starts in the kitchen and we're upstairs? Do I tie you to my body and jump out the window, hoping that the snow will cushion the fall?

These are things that go through my head daily. It's overwhelming.

I'm someone who needs a set schedule so it drives me crazy that I don't know if you're going to sleep for five minutes or five hours at a time. Do I have time to shower or will I end up running to you with soap in my hair because you woke up earlier than I expected and started bawling?

There's also the physical pain I've been experiencing ever since returning home from the hospital. My lower back pain was so terrible that I had to kneel on the floor to change your diaper instead of bending down to get to your level and cross my fingers that you don't spray poop in my face. Nursing and carrying you around has wrecked my shoulders and neck, so much so that sometimes I fear I won't be able to do it anymore.

But, Baby, whenever it is your turn to become a mom, you'll see that you are capable of handling so much more than you ever imagined. Something in you, like it has in me, will drive you to keep on going because you are doing something so much bigger than yourself. You will love this job more than any job you have ever had in your life. You will be rewarded with cuddles, smiles, and sweet coos instead of a paycheck, and that will be more than enough.

Each day will get easier so do what you can to simply survive those first few months. Leave those dishes in the sink. Wear the same pair of yoga pants weeks in a row, even if there's spit up on it. Have your husband order pizza for dinner because you set off the smoke detector for the seventh time in four months. Cry all you want. Be in bed by 7:30pm and asleep by 8pm.

Just know that you are the best mom for your baby and that after this you can conquer anything.

I love you, Baby. Thank you for teaching me that I am stronger than I thought I was.

Luv,
Mom

P.S. Can you please smile at me a little more often? Cause Mama needs it some days.

Thursday, January 15, 2015

I Will Miss: Your Tortoise Neck


Your neck and its million and one tiny folds only reveal themselves when you are truly relaxed. I like to compare it to that of a tortoise as you like to shrink it back and forth. If you're crying, forget about trying to get in there to clean out the collection of lint and remnants of spit up, making it one of your stinkiest body parts. This means that I am forced to wipe off that "neck cheese" while you're sleeping or nursing. The cold makes you shrink your neck back in, and just like that it disappears again.

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Dear Baby: About Your Father

Dear Baby,

They say that little girls grow up and look for husbands that remind them of their fathers. I know that you'll probably be completely grossed out by this, but I hope that this is the case because then we would never have to worry about you.

Your dad is amazing and it is so easy being married to him. He is the man I compare all other men to when friends or family members come to me with their relationship problems. I tell them to "find someone who treats you the way my husband treats me." There's this fallacy that marriage is something you need to work on in order to last. Baby, if you have found the right person marriage will never feel like "work" to you.

Now, I don't claim to be an expert when it comes to marriages and relationships. However, Dad and I have been together for ten and a half years and I can count on one hand the number of fights we've had.  We've been through more hardships together than the average couple during that span of time. Five of those years we spent living over 3,000 miles apart. We survived a deployment and countless weeks away from each other due to the Army. The house you are living in now is the fourth house Dad and I have lived in in just five years. The two of us slept on an air mattress in an empty bedroom for the first few months of our marriage until we slowly built enough in our bank account to buy real furniture. Together, we got through two heartbreaking miscarriages, which I will write about some other time.

Your dad got us through all of this with good spirits simply by being the remarkable man that he is.

Dad is extremely overprotective, which means he'll send you a text before you leave for work in the morning to tell you to be careful driving with foggy windows. He'll always make sure when walking on sidewalks that he walks on the side closest to the road so that he can hop into action if he has to. He'll grab your hand if you're walking through a crowd. If you stay in the car and he steps out to grab takeout he'll stick around and make sure he hears the doors lock before leaving your side.

You will find some of this to be overbearing and I'm sure you will roll your eyes at him at some point, but just know that he does these things because he cares about you so much.


With his protective side comes his sensitive side. He cried the most at our wedding, making all of our guests cry along with him. Marry someone who will pour tears uncontrollably when he sees you walk down the aisle. This is important. He cried when I told him I was pregnant and that he was going to be a father. He cried when we first met you in the hospital, and you can be sure that he will cry when he walks you to your future husband and gives you away.

Your father is so smart, but he doesn't rub it in your face like some others do. He's humble and extremely hardworking. You will never find him complaining about anything. In fact, I just discovered that he has been suffering from daily back pain for all of his adult life due to his time serving in the military. He's never mentioned it once. Marry someone who won't be a big baby when he's ill. This is also important.

Dad will like to surprise you with gifts, ranging from small to extravagant. He has purchased Kate Spade purses and Tiffany earrings for me "just because" and surprised me with gummy bears and flowers after my first day at work. Marry someone who is so excited to give you your gift that he never manages to wait until the day of your birthday or Christmas. Most of all, it's important to reciprocate back. You don't need to spend a lot of money. Just make sure you grab an extra York Peppermint Patty at the checkout line for him at the grocery store or splurge on the pricier chocolate milk. Leave love notes in his lunchbox and on his dashboard. These small things will matter to him.



My sister and I never grew up with any men around. We were responsible for taking out the trash, washing our own cars, fixing anything around the house, killing our own spiders, putting together any furniture, and lugging anything heavy on our own. It made me independent and it helped me survive a year without Dad around when he was deployed to Iraq. Although I want you to be independent as well, I also want you to find someone who will do all of those things for you without any hesitation.

Dad actually gets angry with me when I try to lift anything heavy, open my own doors, or take out the trash. He finds things like this to be his duty as a husband, and I am okay with that. Here's the important thing, though, Baby: At no point should you expect your husband to do these things or else you will grow less appreciative of it all.  I never forget to thank Dad for the things he does around the house, even if it's just changing out a light bulb. On the other spectrum of things, Dad still thanks me for making dinner, doing the laundry, and even for taking care of you all day long. Appreciate each other. This is important.

Your father tells me he loves me at least ten times a day. He'll literally wake me up in the middle of the night to tell me this. Marry someone who will do this, even if you don't necessarily want to be awakened at two in the morning. Also, marry someone who will tell you that you're beautiful daily, even if you haven't showered and have bright pink acne medication on your face. This is important.

But most of all, Baby, know this about your father: He loves us. Every single action he makes is with us in mind. We are so lucky to have him.

Luv,
Mom